March 15, 2006 | | Comments 12

Cinnamon Buns

Make bread while the oven is hot.
~ Iranian Proverb

I love cinnamon buns with cream cheese frosting, so does the others in the family. Everytime I walk past the bakeries or the bakery section in grocery stores I can’t help eyeing the yummy looking cinnamon buns (WITH CREAM CHEESE FROSTING) on the shelves. They are too expensive and costs a dollar or more each. Naw, I can make it much cheaper and tastes just equally as good.

This is my masterpiece — looks good? :-)

BIG_IMG_3684_edited-1.jpg

It’s very simple to make … provided you have a bread machine to make the dough. If you do that manually, there is so many factors that contributes to a perfect dough — kneading, water temperature, proofing the yeast, etc. With the machine, you just need to throw in all the ingredients and let the machine spin it’s magic — all done and prep’ed in two hours. Invest in a bread machine if you don’t have one.

I make this at least once a month. Nothing beats freshly made cinnamon buns when it comes out smelling nice and the soft, fluffy insides that nearly melts in your mouth. Perfect with a cup of fresh brewed coffee.

Ingredients

The ingredients below is used to make 12 cinnamon buns:

  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine, cut up
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1.25 teaspoons active dry yeast or bread machine yeast
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
Instructions
IMG_3591_edited-1.jpgI briefly described making dough in a previous posting (refer to the blog on Spicy Pulled Pork Bun).
IMG_3597_edited-1.jpgI used a rolling pin to roll out the dough to a rectangular shape about 12″ x 8″.
IMG_3598_edited-1.jpgNext, I brush the rolled out dough with melted butter leaving 1″ at the edge. The melted butter will help the brown sugar stick to the surface.
IMG_3606_edited-1.jpgI then sprinkle with brown sugar and cinnamon powder on top of the melted butter. Use as much cinnamon powder or brown sugar as you like it to be.
IMG_3609_edited-1.jpgNext step — I rolled up into a tight roll, lengthwise (i.e. along the wider/12″ side of the dough).
IMG_3612_edited-1.jpgIt is important that you pinch the seam tightly all round, including the two ends. You need to do this so that when you cut it into pieces they don’t unravel.
IMG_3617_edited-1.jpgMake 12 even sized slits on the roll to form 12 pieces. One simple technique is to first make three slits (of four equal sections) and then make further slits in between them to form 12 pieces in all. You understand what I mean?
IMG_3622_edited-1.jpgYou can now cut through the slits to get 12 pieces of individual buns of about 1″ thick each. If you pinch the ends correctly, they should not unravel.
IMG_3624_edited-1.jpgI then arrange the buns on a parchment lined baking pan, spacing them out evenly.
IMG_3627_edited-1.jpgBrush the buns with melted butter. I think doing this will prevent a hard crust on the top. Next step is to allow the buns to rise — this takes about 1 hour. Some people place it in a warm place with a damp tea towel over it. For me, I place them in a slightly warm oven. I normally switch on the oven to the lowest heat while I rolled out the dough. When the buns are prepared, I switch off the oven and place the buns in the oven to rise.
IMG_3666_edited-1.jpgAfter 1 hour, the buns have risen to double its original size and ready to be baked. I used a 13″ by 9″ pan — and once they are risen, they will touch and stick to one another. You want to have them touching and sticking to one another because this will make it form in a squarish shape instead of round.
IMG_3672_edited-1.jpgYou normally bake the buns in a preheated oven at 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Since I used a glass baking pan, I preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Did you know that in baking, you need to lower the temperature by 25 Fahrenheit. if you use a glass pan or dark colour pans? Baking takes just 15 minutes.
IMG_3673_edited-1.jpgSometimes I get some buns which rises too high like horns right out from the oven.
IMG_3674_edited-1.jpgI use a spatula to flatten those buns which rise up too high.
IMG_3675_edited-1.jpgI let the buns cool down for about 20 minutes. I want them to cool down just enough so that the warm buns does not melt the cream cheese frosting.
IMG_3680_edited-1.jpgI used Betty Crocker’s Cream Cheese frosting to frost my cinnamon buns. All you have to do is to stir the ready made frosting about 20 times to soften it before I apply them.
IMG_3682_edited-1.jpgYummy right? For some reason, cinnamon buns without cream cheese frosting does not look as inviting.

I can make this again and again. So, if any Richmond friends want to make this, call me and we can make it together. I bet everyone in your family will like it.

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  1. Matt says:

    Mmmmm, looks really tasty!

  2. TN Chick says:

    Oh my – that looks so yummy. I love cinnimon rolls with icing and now I have teh crave… LOL Thx. ;)

  3. BlueDev says:

    Wow! Those look delicious. I will have to make some.

  4. Lauren says:

    Wow, what a beautiful and stunning blog. I can see how much time you put into creating your posts and I am at awe at what a great job you’re doing. Way to go. The buns look delicious!

  5. Rosa says:

    I really am going to have to bring my bread machine back out. This look luscious!

  6. Suanne says:

    Hi All: Thanks for all the feedback. It’s great to know people read the blog. Hmmm … I am beginning to see a pattern on what type of food blogs generates interests.

  7. Amber says:

    well, i’ll help u if its about chocolates, cheese, cream, people will flock in.
    P.S. these are the things that usually draw me

  8. The Dessert Maker says:

    375/350 degrees Fahrenheit, not Celsius, right?

    I really like the step by step pictures. This is going to be filed under my “breakfast” and “cooking techniques” tags.

  9. Suanne says:

    Hi The Dessert Maker, thank you for pointing out the mistake. I had amended the post accordingly.

  10. Sergiu says:

    It can’t be only 1/2 cup of milk on a 3 cups of flour.

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