Seattle: Popeyes Chicken and Biscuits in Burlington

Oh shoot!

I felt so pressured to keep up blogging on this Seattle series. My memory on this trip is somewhat fading. I had been looking at the screen for the past 5 minutes just thinking of what to share. Sigh … and some of you just gotta say you look forward to this series. Pressure, pressure, pressure! LOL!

We left Richmond kind of late … in the late morning. By the time we got over the border, it was already noon. We drove on and decided to make a stop at Burlington for a quick lunch in a fast food joint. We did not care about what it is except that it should be something we do not have in Canada.


As we drove along the shopping row on S Burlington Blvd looking for a fast food joint we chanced upon the distinctive yellow and red Popeyes Chicken and Biscuits restaurant. Popeyes was one of the places we had on our shortlist of restaurants.

One would have thought that in a place called Popeyes, you would have expected that there will be Popeye (the Sailorman) images all over the restaurant. Nope, there was none at all. Strange.

Anyway, Popeyes is one of the biggest chicken fast food outlets in the US. There is none in Vancouver.


We ordered the 8 pieces Spicy Chicken. It seems like their flagship product just like the Big Mac is to McD’s. It came with some “biscuits”. I still thinks that biscuits means cookies. At least where I grew up, biscuits IS cookies. These US-style “biscuits” should just be simply called bread, or scones.

Anyway, the biscuits were flaky but too dry for my liking. If only I have hot chocolate, I’ll dunk it in. I took a bite and decided I had enough.


Despite being called Spicy Chicken, it is quite mild. We like the crispy skin a lot and the fact that it was not all too greasy Continue reading

Seattle: A Short Spring Break

Alrighty … here I go again with another travel series.

This is the long promised series on Seattle. During the school spring break last month, we decided that we make a short 5-day trip with the primary purpose of checking out a little bit of the food scene in Seattle.


Seattle is sometimes known as the emerald city in reference to the lush green evergreen trees around the area. In many ways, Seattle reminds me of Vancouver. The healthy people and especially the rainy climate are so similar. The big difference is that it the city is much bigger economically than Vancouver. It is after all the home to Microsoft, Boeing, Starbucks,, and Costco to name a few.


There were almost no pre-planning done for this trip. I had been so busy at work these days, I had no real time for myself, let alone plan for vacation. So, this time, I depended almost entirely on the recommendations of the readers of chowtimes. Continue reading

Pineapple Bun (Polo Bun)

Arkensen and Nanzaro love Pineapple Bun, particularly from Lido Restaurant. I got this Pineapple Bun recipe from Helen. Helen has not attempt to make it because the recipe is in grams and cc which is a bit tedious to measure. Morever, Helen said it involves quite a bit of steps which seem quite complicated to her. Anyway, this is my first attempt making it and it turned out quite ok.


The Pineapple Bun (or Polo Bun) turned out quite soft and I think the dough recipe is good for any other bun. The bun remains soft even after two days.


Now, I know why it’s called Pineapple Bun. The name came from the look of the topping which resembles the pineapple skin.

It took me quite long to make it as I was trying to convert the measuring into cups and spoons as far as possible so that it’s easier for me to make it again.



  • 240g bread flour (2 cups less 3 tablespoons), I used all-purpose flour
  • 60g cake flour (8 tablespoons)
  • 45g sugar (3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon)
  • 5g yeast (1 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 30cc or 30ml egg (1 medium egg)
  • 135g water (125ml)
  • 3g salt (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 9g milk powder (2 tablespoons)
  • 30cc or 30ml warm water
  • 45g butter (3 tablespoons)



  • 80g butter (6 tablespoons)
  • 50cc or 50ml egg
  • 1 g salt (a pinch)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 50g icing sugar (1/2 cup)
  • 5g milk powder (1 tablespoon)
  • 150g cake flour (1 1/4 cups)
  • another egg for egg wash


Click on the link below for the instructions.

Continue reading

Light Carrot Cake

This version of Light Carrot Cake is taken from Cook’s Illustrated, November 2006. Carrot cake is often thought of as a healthy alternative to other cakes but names can be deceiving. The problem is although carrot cake sounds healthy for its use of vegetable oil in place of butter and use of carrots as a natural sweetener, most versions of carrot cake tip the scales at 500 calories and 31 grams of fat per slice.

This Light Carrot Cake has the natural sweetness of the carrots and has reduced amount of oil and egg. In order to keep the cake light, the eggs, sugar and oil mixtures is whipped to incorporate air in it. This keeps the cake from being too dense.


This Light Carrot Cake is moist and rich without being soggy and greasy from an overabundance of fat.


  • vegetable cooking spray
  • 2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 pound carrots (about 6 medium), peeled and grated (about 3 cups)

Click on the link below for the instructions.

Continue reading

Classic Carrot Cake

Karen demonstrated two carrot cake recipes upon Rowena’s request If I remembered correctly. The first cake is a Classisc Carrot Cake which was popularized in the 70s. It is an era where people started to reduce the intake of meat and encourage intake of vegetables, grains and fruits. A book called “Diet for a small planet” from the 70s introduced combinations of plant proteins to make a complete protein diet.


The Classic Carrot Cake is a very rich carrot cake with lots of ingredients like crushed pineapple, flaked coconut and walnuts.


  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cups vegetable oil (can be reduced to 1 cup)
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 1 (20 ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained
  • 1/2 cup sweetened flaked coconut
  • 1 cup chopped nuts or pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup raisins


Click on the link below for the instructions.

Continue reading

Yakko Sushi in Burnaby

After the Sun Run, we decided to go for sushi. I knew the boys would have loved it and planned to go to the Sushi Garden located along Kingsway across the street from Metrotown. However, the very popular Sushi Garden was closed. Dashed!


So we walked a few doors away and went instead to a smaller Sushi restaurant. It is called Yakko Sushi (located on 4689 Kingsway). There a quite a few sushi restaurants in this stretch of Kingsway … at least four that I can think of.


I have learned to like Kikkoman soya sauce which is sweet. At Yakko they serve Yamasa soya sauce. I don’t quite like this Yamasa brand. It had a stronger intense taste and a bit too salty for me. Not sure about you but I use the soya sauce to flavor the rice.

Oh, what do you think of the practice of mixing wasabi with soya sauce? I see a lot of people do that but I find that taste strange.


We opted to get one of their Party Trays. Their Party Tray H costs $27.00 which was just enough for the four of us. Continue reading

Vancouver Sun Run 2008

We did the Sun Run last Sunday. We being Arkensen, Nanzaro and myself. Suanne opted out from running because it was too much work for her. LOL! I think she is chicken … she thinks that if she can’t keep up with the Kenyans, she won’t even try. So Suanne became the official Sun Run photographer for the family.


Never having ever ran the Sun Run before, we had no idea how bad the transportation could be. Obviously, driving downtown is out of the question. The other choice for us was to take the B-line from Richmond.

We decided to Skip the B-Line and chose instead to drive to Metrotown and take the Skytrain from there. At least there are lots of parking and there are lots of choices for lunch after the run. Oh yeah … I was thinking of food even before the run started.


I was not too confident that the smallish Skytrain system could even handle the throngs of people converging into the downtown core. So, we started off early … very early … like 2 hours before the official start time of 9AM.

The cars were already quite filled with runners. We could spot them quite easily. Getting downtown by Skytrain was quick.


We could see the BC Place on the way there. The BC Place was the finishing line of the 10K Sun Run.


We wore the timing chip from home. It felt kind of flimsy, the plastic ties they provided. Moreover, it was almost impossible for me to tighten it. It was jiggling all the way and I was so nervous of losing it that I had to take a peak at it every now and then.

Lose that timing chip, you don’t get a time but what is worse is that it will cost you $40 bucks if it is not returned. Yeah, I know … I put it on upside down. Nanzaro told me already. Who cares as long as it captures my time.


Even at slightly past 7AM, there was already a festivity mood. Continue reading

Angel Cake House in Vancouver

Last Saturday morning, we had to go downtown to pickup the Vancouver Sun Run package. So, we decided that we should just go out for breakfast for a change … and to Vancouver, for a change too. I know, we had been eating out a lot within Richmond.

So, we ended up at Fraser and E 44th. Suanne and I had stumbled upon the the Angel Cake House once before and so this is our second visit.


You can’t really find many other places that can beat the Angel Cake House for value. Here, you can get a hearty Chinese breakfast for under $5 with drinks included. Parking is quite plentiful along the street but it was early morning when we were there when traffic is light … especially for a Saturday morning.


Suanne opted for the so-called “Western Breakfast” selection. For $4.95, you could select 2 items from the section. For the first item, Suanne had the French Toast and Shrimp and Mushroom Omelette. The French Toast were two thick sandwiches with Kaya (coconut jam) in between.

The omelette had a generous helping of shrimps. The mushrooms complimented the shrimps well … absolutely great with soya sauce. The only problem with soya sauce is that it is horrendous for the French Toast — we have to be extra careful not to “contaminate” the toast.

That above is considered ONE item …


For the SECOND item, Suanne chose the vermicelli in soup with shredded pork and some pickled thingy. Continue reading

Pumpkin and Potato Stew

I usually park at the Minoru Park parking lot when I go to the Caring Place Community Kitchen. It’s just a short walk away. Today, I was greeted by some awesome full bloom cherry blossoms in Minoru Park. It was a breath-taking sight. The cherry blossoms never fail to marvel me.


There were many people armed with cameras at the Minoru Park. How can I miss out this opportunity.


I like the fullness of this variety of cherry blossoms. Do you know what is the name of this variety?


Back to the Community Kitchen, Minoo shared a Pumpkin and Potato Stew along with the Broccoli Salad I blogged earlier. This is such a simple recipe that Zoe helped Minoo to prepare the dish while Minoo ran to the store to get the beans which she missed out in her grocery shopping.


The Pumpkin and Potato Stew is a one pot meal which is complete with protein, carbohydrate, vitamins and fiber. A good recipe for a lazy day.


  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 to 4 potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 1/2 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 can chopped tomatoes or tomato sauce
  • 1 tomato, chopped (optional if using tomato sauce)
  • 1 can pumpkin puree
  • 1 can of beans (butter beans or Lima beans), rinsed and drained
  • salt, sugar and pepper to taste
  • chili and paprika to taste (optional)


Click on the link below for the instructions.

Continue reading

Cassava Coconut Dessert

Andrea made this rich dessert which she learned from her sister-in-law who is a Vietnamese. I called it a rich dessert because it is made with coconut milk.

Cassava or Yuca is a very hardy tuberous root. Cassava brings back my childhood memory where cassava grew wildly at our backyard. It is very easy to grow them. You just simply cut a portion of the stem and stick it to the ground and a new plant will grow from there. We simply enjoy the cassava by just boiling them in some salt water or make Cassava Cake.


The Cassava Coconut Dessert can be served warm or cold. Andrea’s husband even like it just out from the freezer in a hot summer day.


  • 2 lbs cassava, peel and cut into 1 inch piece; soak in water overnight and drain
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 400 ml regular or skim milk
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes (reduce sugar by half if the coconut flakes is sweetened.


Click on the link below for the instructions.


IMG_5196Combine the drained cassava, coconut milk, milk and sugar in a pot.
IMG_5203Bring it to a boil and lower heat to simmer for 30 to 40 minutes until the cassava is tender.
IMG_5214Turn off the stove and stir in the coconut flakes.

Andrea, thank you for sharing this simple and yet delicious dessert. I simply love it. I totally understand why you said you have a soft spot for this dessert and cant stop eating it.