RSSArchive for June, 2011

Dim Sum at Good Eat Seafood Restaurant on Leslie Road, Richmond

Polly and I planned to go to Kim Ga Nae to try their $7.99 for 5 items lunch special. Unfortunately, when we arrived at 11:00 AM, Kim Ga Nae is not opened yet. So, I went down to go to the door to check their opening hours. What I found is a hand written note on the door that says “Temporary Closed”.  Later,I found out that they are closed for renovation.

With plan A dashed, we had to quickly came up with a plan B. Since we were in the area, I suggested we go to Good Eat Seafood Restaurant for dim sum since I have not been to this restaurant before.

Good Eat Seafood Restaurant is tucked in a small mall area on Leslie Road. It is not a very visible location. Parking is quite limited for this restaurant. There is parking in front, on the side and at the back of the restaurant.

When we arrived at around 11:00AM, the restaurant is not busy. It’s about 1/3 full. But by 12:00PM, this place started to fill up. We noticed most of the customers are Chinese seniors.

We saw a sign on the wall that says this restaurant allows customers to bring their own liquor with a corkage charge of $5.

We like that this restaurant uses real table cloth instead of the plastic ones for quick clean up. The cutleries here showed their age. There is a dollar per person tea charge for the dim sum.

The regular dim sum here ranges from $2.50 to $2.95 while the chef’s specials range from $4.95 to $6.95. Some chef specials items come in 2 sizes where the larger size ranges from $9.95 to $10.95.

We selected 5 items to share. The first item is … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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Pho Hoa on Alexandra Road, Richmond

On one of the weekend when Ben was away, Nanzaro wanted to get some summer clothing like sandal and shorts as he had outgrown them. He knows how to get mommy to bring him shopping when daddy is not around. So, we ended up having lunch at Pho Hoa at Alexandra Road for it’s proximity to Lansdowne Mall. Arkensen agreed because he got to hang out at Best Buy while we go shopping for Nanzaro’s stuff.

Pho Hoa is a franchise Vietnamese restaurant. It has locations in the USA, Indonesia, Korea, Philippine and Taiwan.

You can click on the menu above to have a better view of the franchise locations. We had blogged about Pho Hoa in the Bay area in 2007.

Pho Hoa is a very typical Vietnamese restaurant with the pho noodle soup, rice plates and vermicelli bowl. You can click on the menu to view it larger. However, I noticed that the take out menu they gave me is not up-todate in term of the pricing. Some of the items that we ordered is pricier than those on the take out menu.

The Pho Hoa on Alexandra Road is big and spacious. It is very bright as two of the walls are in full glass as it’s a corner stall. They have two round tables that can cater for bigger groups.

I like that they use plastic chopticks, rather than those one time use bamboo chopsticks. They store the chopsticks in paper wrapper which shows that they care about the cleanliness of the utensils.

Pho Hoa’s inhouse menu has colour pictures which makes ordering easier. Arkensen ordered from the Adventure’s Choice Pho Chin, Nam, Gau, Gan, Sach which has brisket, flank, tendon, tripe and fatty flank. It is … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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Little Sheep Hot Pot in Beijing

Hi Honey:

It was what I call a productive day. I took a couple of hours nap at the hotel after a full day of roaming around Beijing. The day started very early at about 7AM and by the time I got back at 4PM, I had covered the Beihai Park, the Lama Temple, the Bell Tower and the Drum Tower.

Surprisingly I did not sleep long. I think I was beginning to get used to long days on the feet. For dinner that day, I took a 10 minutes walk from the hotel to the Little Sheep Hot Pot.

It is the familiar logo, isn’t it? We have a Little Sheep Hot Pot in Richmond and I had even blogged about it here. One thing I find puzzling is that while in China, this chain hot pot restaurant is called Little Sheep while the restaurant in Richmond is called Mongolian Hot Pot. The Chinese name and the logo remain the same too.

This green round logo is so familiar too. There were quite a number of Little Sheep restaurants in Beijing. They all look high end and expensive looking, unlike the one we have in Richmond which was just so-so.

Yeah, I was kind of worried not knowing what to expect. The restaurant was quite posh. It is certainly one of the more fancier hot pot restaurants I had been to. Everything is sparkling clean. It looked like an expensive setting.

The menu was exciting. It was unlike the small 1-2 pager menu we have in Vancouver. It is like … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon

Lorna is gracious to show me how to make this Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon. Lorna got a pack of “chek lup guat” (in Cantonese) from the meat store on Leslie Road. The “chek lup quat” does not have bones in it despite the name. It is packed in strips. The 3 pounds of “chek lup guat” costs only slightly over $12. I found out later that it’s called beef rib fingers from the packaging in T&T.

The Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon is best consumed the next day. The reason is the meat is quite fatty. If you keep it in the fridge overnight, you can remove the solidified fat easily. Nanzaro and Arkensen likes this meaty dish except that they will leave all the daikon behind for mommy.

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds pack of  beef rib fingers
  • 1 large daikon, peel and cut into chunks
  • 1 bunch of green onions, green and white separated, cut into slivers
  • 1 large onion, slice
  • 4 to 6 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 8 slices of ginger
  • 4 star anise
  • 8 to 10 cloves
  • 1 tablespoon of crystal brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • few drops of sesame oil
  • salt to taste

Source: Lorna

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Thai Dessert – Mango with Sticky Rice (Khao Niao Mamuang)

In the South Arm Community, Minoo decided to do four old recipes which are simple and well received. After more than 5 years of blogging the recipes from the Richmond Community Kitchen, there are at least 600 recipes in my collection. It’s not easy to come out with new recipes which are economical, simple and healthy. From time to time, Minoo will go back to her recipe repertoire to re-do some well received recipes. It does not matter much because not many of the members of the community kitchens stay for a long time except for a few loyal members. People come and go.

So, for this session at the South Arm Community Kitchen, Minoo re-do three recipes. They are Chicken Corn Chili, South Western Slaw and Roasted Sweet Potatoes. Minoo actually planned to make an Easy Lemon Cheesecake for dessert which is also a recipe that we had done before. Since it’s mango season, I volunteer to demonstrate a popular Thai dessert called Mango with Sticky Rice (Khao Niao Mamuang).

Mango with Sticky Rice is a popular street food in Thailand. It’s important to get sweet ripe mango for this dessert. This dessert can also made with ripe  peaches, papayas and durian.

Mango is a fleshy stone fruit which is indigenous to the Indian subcontinent. Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals and nutrients such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin A, C, E, B6 and K.

Ripe mango is sweet and usually eaten raw. Unripe mango is sour and often eaten as a salad with fish sauce or salt such as bagoong in Philipines. Mango is dried and eaten as a snack. Mangoes can be used to make juice, ice-cream, sorbetes or smoothies. There are so many ways to enjoy mango.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sticky rice
  • 1 can (400ml) coconut milk
  • 3/4 cups granulated sugar (can substitute with palm sugar or brown sugar)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 to 4 ripe mangoes
  • toasted sesame seeds or mint or Asian basil sprigs for garnishing (optional)

Source: this recipe is adapted from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid

Serves: 8 to 10

Sticky rice is also known as glutinous rice or sweet rice. Sticky rice does not contain dietary gluten. Therefore it’s safe for gluten-free diets.

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Fukuroku Sushi Express at Real Canadian Superstore on No.3 Road, Richmond

This is another mother and sons dined out while Ben was in Beijing. I had to go to Real Canadian Superstore to do some groceries shopping. I wanted to get the boys out with me for lunch too in order to kill two birds with one stone. With the high gas price nowadays, I try to run as many errands in one go.

I had promised the boys to have sushi for lunch. Initially, we intended to go to Jun Sushi but the moment we came out from the house, it started to rain. So, we changed our plan to go to Fukuroku Express at the Real Canadian Superstore since it has underground parking. Anyway, it is still sushi.

At first I thought this is a very small place for fast Japanese food as the word express implies. Surprisingly, it is fairly big which seats about 25 to 30. This is a self service place, i.e. you order and pay at the counter and help yourself with the water at a corner of the counter too. They only serve cold and hot water.

When the food is ready, you’ll pick up your food from the counter.  There are lots of picture menu pasted all over the place which makes ordering easier. Even their take out menu is all loaded with pictures.

You can click on the menu above for larger view.

I decided to go for … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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The Bell Tower and Drum Tower of Beijing

Hi Honey:

I got scammed. I remember reading about it online but it just did not click until it was too late … or kind of too late.

After the Lama Temple, I was thinking about where to go have something to eat. After walking so much around the Beihai Park and Lama Temple, I also needed somewhere to have a proper seat down too with a cool drink or something.

It was then I remember a lot of people I spoke to recommend that I go to Houhai (the “Rear Sea”) because they have a lot of eateries. My friends at work too told me how great it is and how I must definitely go. Then the Beijing folks I work with the week earlier also recommend the same place. And finally, I remember a rickshaw puller who approached me a few days ago also offered to take me there.

So without hesitation, I hailed a cab for a short ride there.

When I told the cab driver to drop me off at “Houhai” and I want to “chi dongxi” (eat something), he dropped me off on … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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Yonghe Temple: The Largest Tibetan Monasteries in the World

Hey Honey:

From the Beihai Park, I took a cab to the Lama Temple. Since it was mentioned as a must-see place in the guidebook where they devoted two pages to this place, I thought I go check it out. The guidebook did not mention about the size of the temple and so I thought it would be a small compound. I did not realize it was actually the size of a small palace.

Moreover, I was curious about this place because of the word Tibetan in the name. I do not know much about the Tibetan history in the context of China’s history. I know a lot of people are against Tibet being part of China but I do also know that for hundreds of years, Tibet had long association with China in one way or another.

The taxi driver dropped me off on the main street. There were a lot of shops selling Buddhist prayer paraphernalia, like 90% of the shops here sells Buddhism related things. A lot of them sells joss sticks. There were a number of Buddhist monks around in their yellow robes who garnered quite a lot of respect from the people there. Many of the monks do look like they are Tibetans with their darker complexion and weather worn faces.

Entrance was 25 RMB ($4 Canadian) and the audio guide was … More on following page. Click here to continue reading

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