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Onde-Onde

I shared a dessert called Onde-Onde in the Gilmore Park Community Kitchen. We had a sweet treat day as we have two desserts on the same day. Onde-Onde is a popular street food in South East Asia.

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Onde-Onde is very similar to the various Chinese Tang Yuan like Glutinous Rice Ball with Sesame Peanuts Filings, Hong Kong style Tang Yuan and Taiwanese Tang Yuan. The only difference is those Tang Yuan are served in a sweet syrupy soup while Onde-Onde is served dry with shredded coconut coating. It is more like a finger food.

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This Onde-Onde recipe is flavoured with pandan leaves. Pandan leaves (also known as screwpine leaves) are used commonly in the South East Asia in making desserts. You can find pandan leaves in the frozen section of some Filipino groceries stores here and even fresh ones from Vancouver Chinatown.

Pandan leaf is used to impart it’s fragrance into the dessert. It is normally discarded after the dish is made like this Sweet Potato Soup. Pandan leaves are also used as a natural green food coloring.

Ingredients

  • 10 pandan leaves
  • 5 tablespoons water
  • few drops of green coloring (optional)
  • 400g glutinous rice flour
  • 2 tablespoons tapioca flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup of water (more if needed)

Filling:

  • 100g gula melaka (palm sugar)

Coating:

  • 150g grated coconut
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

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Ma Lai Ko Cup Cakes

The next dessert which Ming made is Ma Lai Ko Cup Cakes. I had blogged about two versions of Ma Lai Ko here and here but Ming’s recipe is slightly different. Ming’s version of Ma Lai Ko is steamed in paper cup and it only takes 10 minutes to steam. This recipe is very handy when you have unexpected guests.

Ming made 2 versions of Ma Lai Ko Cup Cakes, one regular flavour and another with grated Parmesan cheese. The one with the Parmesan cheese has a stronger flavour and I’ll bet Arkensen will like this version as he is a cheese lover.

Ingredients

  • 100g all purpose flour
  • 50g castor sugar (was substituted with granulated sugar)
  • 60g egg
  • 70g water
  • 5g baking powder
  • 10g grated Parmesan cheese or custard powder (optional)
  • sweetened dried cranberries for garnishing

Click on Read More for the instructions.

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Steamed Pandan Cake

One of chowtimes reader asked for the recipe of steamed pandan cake and I decided to try to make some adjustments to the Chinese Sponge Cake recipe to incorporate the pandan flavour.

The steamed pandan cake smells great and Arkensen commented that it smells like the Layer Cake which also has pandan element in it.

The only thing is that the bottom part of the cake is more densed than the top part. Do you have any idea why?

Here is the ingredients adjustment I made to the Chinese Sponge Cake:

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup flour (substituted with 1 cup less 2 tablespoons flour plus 2 tablespoons of milk powder)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract (substitute with pandan essence)
  • 1/2 cup evaporated milk (substituted with pandan juice)
  • 4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted

The pandan leaves (also known as screwpine leaves) can be found in Filipino stores. I got mine from Great One Supermarket in Richmond. I’m sure you can find it in Chinatown too.

I’m not sure if we can find the pandan essence here in Vancouver as I got mine from Malaysia. The pandan essense is optional as the pandan juice itself is very fragrant.

To extract the pandan juice, cut up the pandan leaves into 1 inch piece and blend them with water. You then sieve the juice from the pulp.

This Steamed Pandan Sponge Cake is using the original Chinese Sponge Cake recipe with only one minor change, i.e. substituting the vanilla extract with a pandan extract which comes in green colour. This has been my family regular recipe since.

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Fried Banana Fritter (Kuih Kodok)

Fried Banana Fritter or Kuih Kodok in Malay is a common street food in Malaysia. I had not eaten this for 9 years since I immigrated to Canada. I missed it so much that I decided to make it at home despite that I do not like deep frying in my kitchen.

The Fried Banana Fritter is soft and sweet and full of banana flavour. It is best eaten warm. I got the recipe from Kuali but made some adjustment to it as I find that the recipe in Kuali has too much salt in it which makes the banana fritter more savory than sweet. I prefer it to be sweet.

Fried-Banana-Fritter-1Ingredients

  • 150g (net weight) ripe bananas (about 1 large banana)
  • a pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 5 tablespoons self-rising flour
  • 1 tablespoon rice flour
  • 1 tablespoon Quaker oats (I subtitituted with 1 ground flax seed)
  • a pinch of baking soda

Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Layer Cake

In Malaysia, this is called 9 layers cake (Kuih Lapis) as it should have 9 alternate white and pink layers. This cake is very common in the morning or night market.

Each layer of the layer cake is separable and that’s how we eat it, layer by layer. This recipe is from my friend Jessica. I have another recipe which turned out too soft. Perhaps it’s the flour that caused it. I used all-purpose flour as the recipe only says flour. Jessica’s recipe uses rice flour instead.

Ingredients

White layer:

  • 1/2 cup rice flour
  • 3 to 3 1/2 tablespoons tapioca flour
  • 200ml rooster brand coconut milk (which is more liquidy)
  • 1/2 cup + 3 tablespoons castor sugar
  • 100ml water

Red layer:

  • 1/2 cup rice flour
  • 3 to 3 1/2 tablespoons tapioca flour
  • remaining of the coconut milk from a 398ml can
  • 100ml pandan flavour water
  • red food coloring

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Steamed Mah Lai Ko

After my blog about the failed Mah Lai Ko, my friend, Angie shared with me this tested recipe. Angie loves to cook and I’m sure her recipe works.

I’m quite puzzled with the origin of Mah Lai Ko which has a name which indicates Malay Cake but yet, this is a popular dim sum item in Hong Kong Dim Sum restaurant. Can anyone confirm the origin of the Mah Lai Ko?

The Ma Lai Ko turned out soft and airy. It stays soft even the next day. It is not too sweet and has a great caramel flavour to it. This is a sure keeper. Angie, thank you for sharing the recipe.

Ingredients

  • 180g (about 3/4 cup) granulated sugar
  • 110ml water
  • 75g (about 5 tablespoons) margarine, melted
  • 75ml milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 160g (about 1 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Ma Lai Ko

I have been looking for a proven recipe for Ma Lai Ko but not successful until now. This is another Ma Lai Ko recipe I found from a blog by bigboysoven. You can refer to the recipe from this link.

The texture of this Ma Lai Ko turns out quite spongy except that it’s bitter due to the amount of baking soda in the recipe. I do have a little doubt when I measured out the ingredients as I thought 1 tablespoon of baking soda seemed too much. Perhaps, 1 teaspoon is more reasonable and there should be some form of acidic components like lemon juice, yogurt, cream of tartar or buttermilk to go along with the baking soda in order for it to release carbon dioxide, i.e. to make the batter rise. Alternatively, the baking soda can be substituted with baking powder which is made of baking soda plus some acidic components.

No wonder bigboysoven recommended to serve the Ma Lai Ko with some ice-cream. The sweetness of the ice-cream does mask the bitterness of this Ma Lai Ko. I try to serve it with honey for breakfast but the honey is not sweet enough to mask the bitterness. I ended up throwing away the rest of the cake.

Do you have a proven Ma Lai Ko recipe to share? I would love to try it out.

Here is a successful version of Steamed Ma Lai Ko I discovered later.

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Baked Chinese New Year Cake

Betty showed us how to make Chinese New Year Cake, the baked version. The baked version takes much lesser time than the steamed version. Betty made two different flavours of the baked Chinese New Year Cake.

She made one with red bean soup and another just plain. You can make it in coconut milk flavour too.

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This is the coconut milk flavour I made at home. The crust seemed to be thicker as I used two smaller pans to bake it and I forgot to reduce the baking time.

Ingredients

  • 1 package of glutinous rice flour (400g)
  • 3 eggs (medium)
  • 1 1/2 cups water or milk or coconut milk or red bean soup
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar (use 1 cup if red bean soup has been sweetened)

Click on the link below for the instructions.

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