Ian Lai’s Asian Inspired Mah Poh Tofu with Multigrain Rice

Ian Lai made a simplified Mah Poh Tofu to be served with some multigrain rice during the Healthy Eating and Fun Cooking demonstration.


Mah Poh Tofu is a popular Szechuan dish. The name came from the old lady with pocked marked who sell this dish along the street.


  • multigrain rice
  • 200g ground pork
  • salt to taste
  • 1 package of soft tofu
  • 1 package of Mah Poh tofu seasoning


 Source: Ian Lai

Ian bought the above ingredients from T&T

Continue reading

Pork Lettuce Wrap

For the main dish, Michelle prepared a Pork Lettuce Wrap for the Chinese New Year celebration at the South Arm Cooking Club for Seniors.


You can use ground turkey or chicken for this recipe.


Michelle served the meat mixture, lettuce cups, cashew and cilantro separately.  The diners will help themselves with the assembly of the lettuce wrap by spooning the meat and vegetable mixture into the lettuce cup and garnish with cilantro and chopped cashews if desired.


  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons minced ginger
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 1 cup finely chopped button mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup water chestnuts, finely chopped
  •  1 lb ground pork or chicken or turkey
  • 8 to 10 iceberg lettuce leaves, washed and edges trimmed
  • handful of cilantro, chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped cashews


Source: this recipe is adapted from Epicurious.com

Continue reading

Pork Skin in Laksa Broth, with Rau Thom in Moderation

I know. This is not exactly the healthiest of breakfast.

When I was young and growing up in Malaysia, I used to always walk to the open air wet market near my house to buy breakfast. There are a lot of choices but there is one thing I like to buy most of the time is the curry with pork skin. I like it so much that in my last trip back to Malaysia a few years ago, the first place I headed to for breakfast is exactly that.

For some reason, back home in Vancouver, I completely forgot about it.


The reason was because I did not come across pork skins until now. So with the help of Suanne, I made the pork skin in laksa broth above. Maybe the proper word to describe this is not made, but rather assembled.

For those of you who love laksa and pork skin, this will be something you will like a lot. I am sure. The pork skin does a great job in absorbing and holding the laksa making it bursting with flavour.


There are not many places where you can buy pork skins like these above. Or at least I have not paid much attention to it until recently.

What really excites me is that it is really cheap. It is just $2.99 a pound. Not knowing how much is a pound, I told the shop that I wanted $5.00 and they ended up giving me $7.00 worth of it. That makes it well over 2 pounds. Actually it is not really what it is weigh because it also holds some clear jhup which I figure makes up the bulk of the weight.

The owner of the shop told me that not many places will “bow” (translated as explode in English), these pork skin but they do make it themselves. I am wondering if any of you knows of other places who also “bow” pork skins in Vancouver.

With this important ingredient, I am all set to … Continue reading

Marinated Baked Pork Chops

For the main course, Marian prepared a Marinated Baked Pork Chops for the seniors. It is tricky to make a tender pork chop as it usually ends up tough and dry.


This Marinated Baked Pork Chops are moist and quite tender as there is no complain from the seniors.


  • 6 pork chops, trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup


Source: unknown via Marian

Serves 6

Continue reading

Pork Neck Bone with Corn Soup

In the Caring Place Community Kitchen, Joanna shared some very homey Chinese dishes.


The first recipe is a simple Pork Neck Bone with Corn Soup. You may use pork rib to make this soup for a meatier cut of meat. Pork neck bone is very cheap, 99 cents per pound.


  • 2 pounds pork neck bone
  • 4 corns, cut into chunks
  • 3 to 4 slices of ginger
  • 8 to 10 cups of water
  • salt to taste


Source: Joanna;  Serves 6 to 8

Continue reading

Taiwanese Meatball (Ba Wan)

A Taiwanese friend of mine called me up before this South Arm Community Kitchen about the street food that she misses a lot that will be demonstrated by Vicky. It was a surprise call as I had invited her to join the community kitchen a long time ago but I did not hear from her since.


It was the above street food that excited my friend from Taiwan. It is the Taiwanese Meatball or known as Ba Wan in Hokkien.


I had seen this many times in a Taiwanese food show when we had Shaw TV. I missed that show since we switched to Telus. I have never come across this street food here yet. Does anyone know if we can find this Taiwanese Meatball here?


For the skins:

  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 400g yam flour
  • 6 1/5 cup cold water

For the filling:

  • 400g ground pork
  • 1 cup (about 8) dried shiitake mushroom, reconstituted
  • 1 cup (170g) dried bamboo shoot
  • 2 tablespoons dried shrimps
  • 1 tablespoon fried onion
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced

Marinates for pork:

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper powder
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch


  • 1 tablespoon cooking wine
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon five spice powder


For the sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons rice flour
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon miso
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup

Tools required:

  • Steam baskets
  • Small bowls


Source: Vicky

Yield 15 meatballs

Continue reading

Vietnamese Caramelized Pork

Note: This is a milestone post … post #2000! Glad we made it this far. :-)

This recipe is from Bonnie, Ben’s colleague, who gave us her recipe after we visited Mui Ngo Gai.


It did not turned out as the Mui Ngo Gai version but taste wise, it’s good. Sweet and salty at the same time with a strong black pepper taste. Even Arkenzen and Nanzaro loves this.


  • pork belly, cut into small slices (approx 2 lbs, I used pork butt or in Cantonese ‘Char Siew Yoke’)
  • sugar (approx 2-3 tbsp)
  • fish sauce (approx 1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons)
  • freshly cracked black pepper, about 2 teaspoons
  • 1 teaspoon crushed chili, optional


Source: Bonnie Leong

Serves 4 to 6

Continue reading

Boiled Pork and Cabbage Dumplings

The main Chinese New Year dish made in the South Arm Cooking Club for Seniors is Boiled Pork and Cabbage Dumplings. Dumpling or jiaozi is a traditional dish eaten during Chinese New Year’s Eve and some other festivals. Family members gather together to make dumplings as wrapping dumplings is quite time consuming. Such activity also brings the family closer.


Dumplings can be boiled or pan fried. Boiling is a healthier choice of cooking.

Dumplings can be freeze on the baking sheet. Once they’re completely frozen, place them in a ziplock bag for future consumption.


  • 12 ounces napa cabbage leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup minced Chinese chives or green onions
  • 2/3 pound ground pork
  • 1/8 teaspoons ground pepper
  • 1.5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or dry sherry)
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 package refrigerated round dumpling wrapper (50 pieces)


Source: adapted from Asian Dumplings by Andrea Nguyen

Prep time: 40 minutes;  Cook time: 20 minutes;  Yield 50 dumplings

Chris O’Brennan, Helena, Sdyney, Frances and Chris made these dumplings.

Continue reading

Vietnamese Cuisine: Spring Rolls (Cha Gio)

We were very excited when Minoo told us that she had invited one of South Arm Community Kitchen’s pioneer member, Doris to demonstrate some Vietnamese dishes. Doris is a third generation Chinese Vietnamese here. It is such a privilege to be able to invite her to demonstrate in the kitchen as she is a very busy hair dresser now.


The spring roll is deep fried until the skin is crispy. This is a great appetizer or finger food for holiday entertaining.


Of course, the spring roll has to go with the Fish Sauce dipping sauce. The sourness of the dipping sauce cuts back the heaviness of the meat.

Ingredients for Spring Roll:

  • 2 pounds ground pork
  • 5 pieces black fungus, reconstituted in some water, finely chopped
  • 2 bunches of mung bean vermicelli, soak in some water to soften and cut into smaller strands.
  • 1 pound taro root
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 egg (optional)
  • 1 package spring roll rice paper wrap (Asian boy brand recommended)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Ingredients for Fish Sauce for dipping:

  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 tablespoons hot water
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice (or 3/4 tablespoon vinegar)
  • 1 tablespoon garlic chili sauce (optional)


Continue reading

Pork Jowl Stirfry with Green Bean

I have a piece of the pork jowl left in my freezer.  I decided to use it to stirfry with green beans for the vege dish for dinner.  Ben’s requirement for dinner is a meat dish. a vegetable dish and a soup.


This is a very simple stirfry dish.  You can use other meat like chicken to substitute the pork jowl.


  • a slice of pork jowl, about 5 to 6 oz, thinly sliced
  • a tablespoon light soy sauce
  • a tablespoon oyster sauce
  • a tablespoon rice wine
  • a teaspoon sugar
  • a drizzle of sesame oil
  • a sprinkle of ground white pepper
  • a teaspoon corn starch
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • salt to taste
  • a bunch of green beans, trimmed both ends and sliced at an angle


  • Marinate the pork jowl with the soy sauce, oyster sauce, rice wine, sugar and white pepper for at least 30 minutes
  • Add cornstarch to the meat and blend well just before frying
  • Heat a frying pan with a tablespoon of oil
  • Saute garlic until fragrant
  • Stir fry the marinated pork jowl for a few minutes or until almost cooked
  • Add the green beans and stir fry to combine
  • Add a few tablespoons of water and cover to simmer for another 5 minutes or until the green beans are tender.
  • Add a pinch of salt to taste
  • Serve with steamed rice