Simple Sauteed Chard

Michelle shared another not so common vegetable in the South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club; Chard.

Chard really tends to cook down significantly, so start with a huge pile of greens.

Ingredients

  • 2 large bunches of chard
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 to 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves (not the powdered version)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt or more to taste
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup (or a touch of tomato sauce or a tomato, chopped)
Notes on preparing chard:
Let chard soak in water for a few minutes and swish around to remove debris. Rinse.
Rip stems from leaves. Separate into stems and leaves. Finely cut stems. Roughly chop leaves.
Cooking the stems for a few minutes before the leaves makes them much more tender. Small, tender chard stems do not need this treatment and can be roughly chopped and cooked with the greens.
Source: South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club

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Savoury Impossible Pie

Michelle shared another pie recipe in the South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club with the popularity of the Spinach Pie in an earlier cooking session.

This Savoury Impossible Pie is more like a quiche.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 to 3 slices bacon
  • 3 scallions, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 5 oz canned sweetcorn kernels (rinsed or drained) or 3/4 cup frozen

Source: this recipe is adapted from Nigella.com

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Roasted Carrots & Parsnips

In another cooking session for the South Arm Older Adults Community Kitchen, Michelle shared a roasted root vegetables recipe to encourage usage of parsnip which is not a so common root vegetable to some participants.

Michelle shared the nutritional facts about the root vegetables in this recipe:

Carrots:

  • Carrots are an excellent source of beta-carotene, and contain high amount of fiber. Beta carotene is important for eyesight, skin health, and normal growth.
  • Carrots are a good source of fiber, vitamin C and potassium, as well as vitamin B6, folate, and several minerals including calcium and magnesium.

Parsnips:

  • Parsnips are a strong scented plant cultivated for its white edible root.
  • Parsnips are a root vegetable related to the carrot family. Parsnips resemble carrots but are paler and have a stronger flavour. In Scotland, parsnips are still known as “white carrots”.
  • Parsnips are a good source of vitamin C and vitamin B which assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin and nerves.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds carrots
  • 1 1/2 pounds parsnips
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Peel carrots and parsnips. Have them lengthwise, and cut each diagonally into 3/4″ pieces.
  • Toss in bowl with olive oil, thyme, salt and pepper.
  • Spread in a single layer pan, roast for 1 hour to 1 hour and 20 minutes, tossing occasionally.

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Perfect Oatmeal Raisin Cookies with 6 ingredients

Michelle shared an Oatmeal Raisin Cookies with 6 ingredients in the South Arm Older Adults Community Kitchen.

We made the cookies with extra ingredients like vanilla, ground cinnamon and baking powder to add more flavour and rise to the cookies.

Michelle brought up the issue of the new threat to health is sugar. She told us that she generally reduces the amount of sugar in her baking by half especially for those recipes that have other sweet ingredients like banana, dates, etc in it.

Ingredients

  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) softened butter
  • 1 cup sugar, preferably dark brown sugar (we used 3/4 cup)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats (or 1 cup quick oats as quick oats absorb more moisture than rolled oats)
  • 1/2 tablespoon vanilla (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon powder (optional)
  • kosher salt (optional)

Source: BakerBettie.com

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Honey Roasted Pecans

Michelle made some Honey Roasted Pecans at the South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club, just to use up the pecans in the pantry.

These Honey Roasted Pecans are great for snacking without the excessive salt from store bought one.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups raw pecans
  • 1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt, plus more to finish if desired

Source: fixmeasnack.com

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Classic Greek Salad

The South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club made a Classic Greek Salad to complement the Spinach Pie with Greek flavorings.

This classic summer salad with olive oil and redwine vinaigratte captures the sunny flavours and colors of the Mediterranean.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pint cherry tomatoes, halved or 2 large tomatoes, diced
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced
  • 1 medium cucumber, diced
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • handful of Italian parsley, chopped
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 handfuls kalamata olives, pitted (we omitted this)
  • 8 ounces feta cheese, crumbled or cubed

Source: In the Kitchen with Stefano Faita

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Spinach Pie

The South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club made a Spinach Pie to go with the Leftover Lentil Soup.

2 cups of spinach provides:

  • more than 100% of your Vitamin A
  • a good source of folate, Vitamin C, iron, magnesium and potassium

Ingredients

  • 1 store bought deep frozen pie crust
  • 1 bag spinach or 1 large bunch spinach, washed and dried
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 medium onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese, or more as desired
  • 1 egg
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Flavorings:

Italian:

  • 1/2 cup drained sundried tomatoes, diced
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

Greek:

  • 1/2 cup feta cheese
  • 2 teaspoons dried dill
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

Source: South Arm Older Adults Community Kitchen

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Lentil Leftover Soup

The South Arm Older Adults Cooking Club met again for another cooking session.

Michelle, the facilitator of the kitchen calls this Lentil Leftover Soup. You can use any leftover vegetables like spinach, rapini, swiss chard, etc in this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 3 celery, diced
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 8 cups vegetables or chicken broth or water
  • 2 cups lentils (brown)
  • 1 x 14oz can diced tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons salt if using water (a pinch if using broth)
  • 1 teaspoon ground pepper
  • spinach (we used baby spinach) or any leftover leafy vegetables

Soaking the lentils helps the body to absorb its nutrients more easily.

Michelle shared the health benefits of eating lentils from mindbodygreen.com in the kitchen.

  1. Lower Cholesterol – Lentils help to reduce blood cholesterol since it contains high levels of soluble fiber. Lowering your cholesterol levels reduces your risk of heart disease and stroke by keeping your arteries clean.
  2. Heart Health – Several studies have shown that eating high fiber foods like lentils reduces your risk of heart disease. Lentils are also a great source of folate and magnesium, which are big contributors to heart health. Folate lowers your homocysteine levels, a serious risk factor for heart disease. Magnesium improves blood flow, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Low levels of magnesium have been directly associated with heart disease, so eating lentils will keep your heart happy.
  3. Digestive Health – Insoluble dietary fiber found in lentils helps prevent constipation and other digestion disorders like irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulosis.
  4. Stabilized Blood Sugar – Soluble fiber traps carbohydrates, slowing down digestion and stabilizing blood sugar levels. This can be especially helpful for those with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia.
  5. Good Protein – Of all the legumes and nuts, lentils contain the third highest levels of protein. 26 percent of lentil’s calories are attributed to protein, which makes them a wonderful source of protein for vegetarians and vegans.
  6. Increase Energy – Lentils increase steady, slow burning energy due to its fiber and complex carbohydrates. Lentils are also a good source of iron, which transports oxygen throughout your body and is key to energy production and metabolism.

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