Suey Choy (Napa Cabbage) Pork Dumpling


Betty made Suey Choy Pork Dumpling in the Caring Place Community Kitchen a couple weeks ago.

This is the pan fried version which I find is more tasty than the boiled version. The boiled version is best served in hot broth to keep it warm. You can check out the technique of making the boiled version at this link.

IMG_9368_edited-1

Ingredients

  • 1 package of fresh dumpling skin (about 50 pieces)
  • 1 lb lean ground pork
  • 1 1 small suey choy (napa cabbage), finely chopped
  • 3 green onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon of minced ginger
  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon salt

IMG_9339_edited-1

Instructions

IMG_9340_edited-1Marinate with pork with dark soy sauce, sesame seed oil, green onion and ginger for half an hour.
IMG_9346_edited-1In the meantime, finely chopped the suey choy. You may substitute the suey choy with flat chives. The addition of prawns will enhanced the chives flavour. Add the chopped suey choy into the marinated pork and mix well.
IMG_9351_edited-1This is a quick technique of making dumpling demonstrated by Betty.

Put a tablespoon of filling onto the dumpling skin. Pinch the top together.

IMG_9352_edited-1Place the dumpling between your thumb and index fingers on both hands and press the remaining unseal skin together tightly.
IMG_9357_edited-1It does need a lot of practice to make a good looking dumpling. We had a lot fun try our hands on making the dumplings. You can see there are various shapes of dumplings in the tray made by different people.
IMG_9366_edited-1Betty first cook the dumplings in boiling water until they float to the top. Then, the dumplings are removed from the boiling water, drained and dried using paper towels. She then panfried the dumplings until all sides are golden brown.

Betty, thank you for sharing the technique of making dumplings.

15 thoughts on “Suey Choy (Napa Cabbage) Pork Dumpling

  1. I never heard of “suey choi” before but from the picture, I would think it is just another name for napa.

      • I just figured I would hunt it down until I found a photo and was surprised to see napa which I and many others have used for years. It would be helpful when using a less common name (suey choi) for an ingredient commonly know but by another name (napa),the more common name could be included set off by commas or parentheses.

      • I have also used suey choi (siu choy) for many years and never known it to be called napa until California farmers started growing it in the Napa Valley. Depending where a person is from this veg can be called either and both would be a common name for it. I have also seen 2 types; one long and narrow, the other is shorter and grows thicker.

      • Hmmm … come to think of it. What does the sign says in the supermarkets in Vancouver? I know they says “Suey Choy” in the Asian stores and farm markets in Vancouver … but am wondering what they put up in places like the Superstore, IGA, and places like that.

  2. Pingback: Chow Times » Weekend Musings (06-Feb-2010)
  3. Just wanted to add that in UK (and maybe other Western countries) this kind of dumpling is called “Pot Stickers” and in Japan, they are known as “Gyoza”.

    I want also to add that I totally love your illustrative step-by-step pictorial guides to your recipes! I think ALL recipes should be presented in this manner! It’s so helpful and clear! Well done and keep it up!! Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s