Seattle: Piroshky, Piroshky in Pike Place Market

There is never a lack of eating places in the Seattle’s Pike Place Market. Everywhere you turn, you will come across food from every corner of the world and all of them seems so authentic.

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We came across this small little dank looking shop and had a long queue of customers. The queue was so long that it spilled out to the sidewalk. Well, with a line that long, this place would certainly be something.

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The name of the place is called Piroshky, Piroshky. It sounds a lot like a Russian — I wasn’t particularly sure. I had expected to see Russian looking people running the place but the person who attended to us looked very much like Chinese. But other than that, the place does look authentic Russian.

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The line moved quite fast. We could see them making whatever they call it from the outside window. They do look very delicious. And the aroma too, does tell us that we simply must try it.

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We got ourselves two items and decided that we should just eat it in the store. The place is really tiny and has only 4 stools against a wall counter — just enough space for us.

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We had no idea what is what and so decided to get something with a piroshky name in it. The Beef and Cheese Piroshky is really tasty, especially when it is just freshly made out of the oven. This one costs $4.50.

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We also had the Moscow Roll. It was so unbelievably soft, flaky and flavorful. It’s simply some of the best rolls we every tasted. I think this one is about $3.50. It’s not cheap, I say but worth every penny.

If not for the fact we were so full already and had the cheesecakes, we would have gotten a few other items to try or to bring back to the hotel. Next time we’re in Seattle, we’ll definitely come back and try their other stuff.

BTW, piroshky is perogies, is that right? Isn’t perogies something like dumplings that you boil in water? If I had not went into the store, I would have assumed that this place sells perogies. *shrugs*

Piroshky Piroshky on Urbanspoon

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  1. Jessica

    Perogies are the best! If you haven’t tried them you have to. Homemade ones are the best but store bought are ok too…just don’t get the cottage cheese kind. You can either boil them or cook them in a frying pan with a touch of butter. Traditionally they are served with sour cream for dipping but salsa goes well with them too.

    When my mom cooks them she serves them on a plate with diced up tomatoes and onion and a sprinkle of cheddar cheese on top.

  2. RobynT

    Check out this site on Dumplings of the World: http://www.kaleberg.com/dumplings/dumplings.html

    And wikipedia says piroshki=pierogi.

    And since they are Chinese-looking serving Russian/Eastern European food, maybe they are from those areas that are mixed. I had a student from Kazakhstan who looked like kids in Hawai’i that are mixed Asian and white. And do you remember that model Irina Pantaeva? She is from Siberia and looks Asian.

  3. LotusRapper

    Yeah I love ’em too, esp. the onion or cheddar/onion fillings. I pan fry ’em in a non-stick like Japanese gyozas so there’s that nice crispy caramelized bottom. I use 5% or more sour cream with some chopped basil and chives mixed in as accompaniment. Mmmmmm.

  4. Eat-Snap-Repeat

    I love this place.
    Went there during my last trip to Seattle and had a savory pastry containing salmon and cream sauce (forget the name). It was delicious. A bit on the expensive side though (maybe I’m too accustomed to Chinese bakeries).

  5. omnivore

    The Russian equivalent (in food terms, not linguistic terms) for pirogies are verenekies. Piroshkis translate as little pies and are baked.

  6. wyn

    I figure it was too crowded for you to get a shot of the display case:

    http://flickr.com/photos/w_yvr/20402757/

    I LOVE that place! Good thing piroshkis are little pies and not perogies. I look forward to Piroshky Piroshky above all else (food) in Seattle. πŸ˜€

  7. MOLLY

    We came across this shop and ordered a cheese pirosky. They seemed a little spendy but it was so worth it. We went back and bought more because they were so great.

  8. ainwa

    If you like to try different foods, you should check out the Crossroads Mall next time you’re in the Seattle area. It is in Bellevue on the corner of 8th and 156th. They have a Piroshky Piroshky booth and there is plenty of seating. There are also booths featuring authentic Korean, Japanese, Greek, Indian, Thai, and many more. On weekend nights, there is a stage with live music in the center, and you can play Chess on a giant set. There are two sets, one quite competitive and one at the other end for recreational players.

    Really a fun spot that tourists don’t know about. It caters to Microsoft employees who hail from all corners of the globe.

  9. Jasper Jugan

    first saw this on an anthony bourdain show, tried it once when i went to the city. nice food!

  10. Moms Dish

    Well there is a difference, everyone clals them a little different depending on a region of Russia. Here is a link to my recipe the way I make them, http://momsdish.com/recipe/138. They are actually very simple to make.

    BTW, they Asian looking person can be from Russia also because some parts of Russia has people that look Asian, like Siberia area. πŸ™‚

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