Tender Steak Roll filled with Vegetables

The South Arm Community Kitchen made the main dish last as it is to be consumed hot.


The main dish we made was Tender Steak Roll filled with Vegetables. This can be grilled or pan fried.


  • 8 thin slices sirloin or flank steak
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Rosemary, chopped and crushed
  • 1 red pepper, sliced into thin strips
  • 1 medium zucchini, sliced into thin strips
  • 1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • a few mushrooms, cut into thin slices

For the Rosemary Balsamic Glaze

  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup dark balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons dry red wine
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • Rosemary
  • 1/4 cup vegetable stock


Source: South Arm Community Kitchen

Serves 8

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The South Arm Multicultural Community Kitchen made a Greek theme meal.


The first recipe is Moussaka.


We served the moussaka with a yogurt dip.


  • 4 Asian eggplants
  • 2 carrots diced
  • 3/4 pound ground beef
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup Panko bread crumbs or oats
  • 1 teaspoon ketchup
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • ground pepper to taste


Source: South Arm Community Kitchen

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Beef Stew with Noodles

The South Arm Women Community Kitchen is back in action after Christmas break.


For the first kitchen, Michelle prepared 3 simple recipes for some old and some new participants. The main course is a Beef Stew with Noodles. This is a hearty one pot complete meal.


  • Use affordable chuck roast for stews because it becomes tender and flavourful as it simmers. Cutting the meat into smaller pieces shortens the cooking time.
  • Cutting vegetables into evenly sized cubes helps to ensure that they’ll finish cooking at the same time.


  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 pounds boneless beef chuck, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • salt and ground pepper
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cans (14.5 ounces each) chicken broth (preferably reduced-sodium)
  • 1/2 pound carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice
  • 2 cups egg noodles (or more)
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 teaspoon red-wine vinegar


Source: This recipe is adapted from MarthaStewart.com

Serves about 6, depending on serving size

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Beef Burgers

For the BBQ theme, the South Arm Seniors’ Kitchen had some Beef Burgers for lunch.


We made small patties of Beef Burgers for portion control purpose and served them on slider thins from President’s Choice.


  • 1 pound good quality ground beef
  • 12 plain crackers
  • 8 sprigs fresh Italian parsley, finely chopped, including the stalks
  • 2 heaped teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 egg
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • olive oil


Source: via Colleen

Yield 6 to 7 burgers

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Classic Lasagna

The main course for the South Arm Community Kitchen is a Classic Lasagna. Lasagna noodle is a wide and flat type of pasta.


Kids will love this cheesy Classic Lasagna. It is great for pot luck.


  • 12 lasagna noodles
  • 1 tub (475g) extra smooth ricotta cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 pinch pepper
  • 3 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Tomato Meat Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 1 rib celery, diced
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef
  • 1/3 cup tomato paste
  • 2 cans tomato sauce
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh basil or 2 teaspoons dried basil


Source: this recipe is adapted from Canadian Living

Serves 12

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Zucchini Meat Loaf

The Richmond Community Kitchen resumed operation in September. The first kitchen took place at the Gilmore Park Church.


Minoo prepared 3 recipes for this first kitchen. The main dish is a healthier version of meat loaf with the incorporation of zucchini. Zucchini is a summer squash. Zucchini has a delicate flavour and requires little cooking cooking time. You can steam, boil, grill, bake, barbecue or fry it.

Here are some of recipes using zucchini that we had made in the community kitchens:

Zucchini is low in calories (approximately 15 calories for 100g of fresh zucchini). It contains useful amount of folate, potassium, Vitamin A and manganese.


  • 4 tablespoons Dijon honey mustard
  • 2  to 3 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper or to taste
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 1/2 pound zucchini (about 2 small zucchini), coarsely grated
  • 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 pound lean ground beef


Source: via Minoo

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Ian Lai’s Healthy Asian Cooking: Broccoli and Beef Stir Fry

Are you overwhelmed when you shop at the sauces aisle in Chinese groceries? I am. There are so many types of sauces that even as a Chinese I have not try all of them.


Ian Lai shared some of the more common sauces that he uses in the Healthy Asian Cooking workshop. They include soy sauce, oyster sauce, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, hot bean sauce,  etc.


One of the sauces that stands out is the Korean Gochujang Hot Pepper Paste because Ian Lai said it is MSG free. As for soy sauce, the Japanese Tamari is also MSG free.


The last recipe in the Healthy Asian Cooking is Broccoli and Beef. Ian’s Lai take for the popular Broccoli and Beef you find in Chinese restaurants is very different. He cooks the beef separately and he added multigrains and goji berries into this dish.


  • 1 flank steak
  • 1 head of broccoli, cut into flowerets, slice stem to same bite size so that they cook evenly
  • 1 package of snow peas
  • 1 bunch of cilantro, rough chopped
  • 1 bunch of green onions, chopped
  • 1 bunch of water crest, rough chopped
  • 1 handful of goji berries, re-hydrated in cold water for a few minutes until plump
  • 1 or 2 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 1 whole garlic clove
  • 2 slices of ginger

Marinate for flank steak

  • salt to taste
  • 1 tablespoon of sesame oil
  • 1 big tablespoon Gochujang
  • 1 big  tablespoon of oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of rice wine vinegar


  • 2 red bell peppers
  • 1/2 block of soft tofu
  • 1/4 teaspoon of togarashi (Japanese spice mix)
  • salt to taste


  • 2 cups of multigrains
  • 3 cups of water


The above is the package of multigrains that Ian used. You can get them from T&T or Osaka Supermarket. The 2 kg package costs around $1o to $12.

It’s a very cultural thing for Chinese to eat steamed white rice with dishes. The rice is usually washed a number of times until the water runs clear. Ian shared with us that their family gradually changed to not washing the rice as it’s his daughter’s responsibility to cook rice. After much complaints, they forgo the washing of the rice. Nowadays, they try to eat other grains instead of white rice. White rice has the least nutrients as all the good nutrients have been polished away.

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Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon

Lorna is gracious to show me how to make this Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon. Lorna got a pack of “chek lup guat” (in Cantonese) from the meat store on Leslie Road. The “chek lup quat” does not have bones in it despite the name. It is packed in strips. The 3 pounds of “chek lup guat” costs only slightly over $12. I found out later that it’s called beef rib fingers from the packaging in T&T.


The Braised Beef Rib Fingers with Daikon is best consumed the next day. The reason is the meat is quite fatty. If you keep it in the fridge overnight, you can remove the solidified fat easily. Nanzaro and Arkensen likes this meaty dish except that they will leave all the daikon behind for mommy.


  • 3 pounds pack of  beef rib fingers
  • 1 large daikon, peel and cut into chunks
  • 1 bunch of green onions, green and white separated, cut into slivers
  • 1 large onion, slice
  • 4 to 6 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 8 slices of ginger
  • 4 star anise
  • 8 to 10 cloves
  • 1 tablespoon of crystal brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • few drops of sesame oil
  • salt to taste


Source: Lorna

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Stuffed Pepper with Beef and Brown Rice

The South Arm Cooking Club for Seniors met again at Bethel Church. For this meeting, Stella and Minoo were not able to make it and Marian was in charged of the kitchen. Perhaps, it was during the spring break, not many turned up for this kitchen. There were four seniors and four volunteers.


Marian prepared four recipes for this kitchen. The above is Stuffed Pepper with Beef and Brown Rice. Bell peppers are in season and they are cheap. Bell pepper is also known as sweet pepper or capsicum. The green one is more pungent, that’s why Marian used the red, yellow and orange ones which are sweeter. Due to the shape and hollow nature of the bell pepper, it is great to be used as a container for stuffing.

Bell pepper is low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. It is high in dietary fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Potassium, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, folate, Manganese, Magnesium and Pantothenic Acid. Bell pepper is ideal for maintaining optimum health and weight loss.


  • 6 red or yellow or orange peppers
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 1/4 cup chopped onions
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 1/4 cups cooked brown rice
  • 3 to 4 green onions, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil


  • 1 can dice tomato
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • pinch of cayenne pepper


Source: this recipe is adapted from Lazy Day Cooking

Serves 6

You may substitute brown rice with 2 cups of quinoa. The orange juice can be substituted with lemon juice.

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Pastel de Papa (Argentinean Potato Pie)

In the South Arm Community Kitchen, Minoo demonstrated this Pastel de Papa dish, especially for Emily. Emily had requested recipes for potatoes as her son loves potatoes. Unfortunately, on the day of the demonstration, Emily called in sick at the last minute. So, Emily, you can check in here for the recipe.


I like the name Pastel de Papa. Sounds like Papa’s Pie. Actually it means just Potato Pie in Spanish. This is really similar to Shepherd’s Pie in that it is covered with mashed potatoes.

Pastel de Papa is a popular Argentina food. It is also known as Chilean potato pie which is a staple in that country. It’s a hearty country food and simple to make. This is a great dish for potluck party.


  • 10 to 12 potatoes, peel and cut into chunks
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 1/2 medium onions, dice
  • 2 tablespoons oils
  • 2 1/2 pounds lean ground beef
  • a large can of diced tomatoes
  • 3 or four eggs
  • 1/2 cup green pitted olives
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • paprika, salt and pepper to taste
  • chili flakes to taste, optional
  • freshly chopped cilantro, optional
  • few pinches of ground nutmeg


Source: Minoo

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