Chives Pocket

Once again, Julie shared in the South Arm Community Kitchen. Julie made two types of dumplings with chives. The first dumpling is called Chives Pocket, a giant dumpling which is pan fried. I’m not sure if I translated it correctly as it is called ‘Jiu Chai Hert Zi’ in Mandarin which literally means chives in a container.

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Chives have a beneficial effect on the circulatory system, in lowering the blood pressure. Chives are also rich in vitamins A, C, and contain trace of sulfur and iron. Chives are also rich in fiber.

Chives are grown for their leaves, which are used for culinary purposes as condiment.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 bunch of chives, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch of vermicelli
  • 2 squares of dried spiced bean curd
  • 1 piece of ginger about 1 inch, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon chicken seasoning
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped (optional)
  • 3 eggs

Ingredients for the dough

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour (or mixture of 3 cups of all-purpose flour with 1 cup whole wheat flour)
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon salt

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Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Bak Kwa

We had a picnic among friends just in the past weekend. It was perhaps the largest we had organized with over 50 adults and children attending. We could not have chosen a better weekend as the day was simply beautiful and a great time to be outdoors. Feels like summer already to us!

It was a pot luck picnic and as usual, everyone tries to bring something unique to the picnic to share. Suanne had a great idea to make something new for a change — Bak Kwa (or Rougan in Mandarin or Yoke Kon in Cantonese). Bak Kwa is basically dried meat … perhaps like the western Jerky but not quite. Bak Kwa is miles better than any Jerkies in the world, I swear.

Surprisingly the way to make it is a simple process although it could be tedious and time consuming to prepare the slices. There is a two step process … the first is to prepare dried slices from minced meat (Suanne used pork) and then the second part is to grill it to release the juiciness.

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The pictures below does not do justice to the taste. Well, it was my first time grilling the Bak Kwa but really it should look like this (click here). However it looked, it actually tastes not bad … not great but really good.

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Update 03-Mar-2010: Someone wrote that this recipe originates from the site Lily’s Wai Sek Hong. Because this recipe had been posted almost 3 years ago, I cannot recall exactly where this recipe originates from.

Here is how you make it …

Ingredients

  • 1 kg ground pork (from the part called Mui Tao Sao)

Marinate:

  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 200g sugar (more if you like it sweeter)
  • 1/8 teaspoon five spiced powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kam cho (licorice) powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 tablespoons rose wine
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons honey

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Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Twice Cooked Pork Belly

Twice Cooked Pork Belly is one of my favourite dish. I like to order this whenever I visit a Shanghai restaurant. I’m glad that Julie demonstrated how to make it in the South Arm Community Kitchen.

Twice Cooked Pork Belly is a spicy dish and quite heavy in seasonings. So, it goes best with steam rice.

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Julie served the Twice Cooked Pork Belly with Hong-Zao Fried Rice along with another dish; Hong-Zao Stir-Fried Pork. The meal ended with Sweet Potato Soup with lots of ginger to enhance the flavour.

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Here is the recipe for the Twice Cooked Pork Belly.

Ingredients

  • 1 slab of pork belly, about 1 lb
  • 1 medium cabbage
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon chopped ginger
  • 1 tablespoon spicy broad bean paste (“lark tou pan jiang”) or chilli sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sweet fermented bean paste (“tien mien jiang”)
  • dark soy sauce for colour
  • sugar to taste

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Pork Bulgogi

Bulgogi is a popular dish in Korea. Bulgogi literally means “fire meat” in Korean, therefore it is usually grilled, barbecued, broiled or pan fried. Generally bulgogi is referred to a beef dish but you can also make it with pork or chicken.

Minnie made a Pork Bulgogi in the community kitchen. This dish is very flavourful and goes well with steamed rice. Traditionally, Korean served Bulgogi on a piece of lettuce and seasoned with a dab of gochujang (red chili paste) and garnished with a piece of kimchi and garlic and eaten whole as a wrap.

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Ingredients

  1. Pork, thinly sliced (Minnie used a combination of pork belly and pork butt)
  2. Juice from 1/2 apple, 1/2 kiwi and 1 pear (or used can juice instead)
  3. Soy sauce, red pepper paste, corn syrup (or sugar), sliced onions (or green onions), sesame oil, minced garlic, dried rosemary, ground peppers
  4. vegetables of your preference like carrot, yam, sweet peppers

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Taiwanese Style Minced Pork

This is the 100th entry for the community kitchen, It’s been more than a year since I joined the community kitchen. It is a great place to learn new recipes from different cultures and meet new friends. I would like to thank all who had shared their recipes and extended their friendship.

Heidi shared a few dishes at the Gilmore Park Church community kitchen. She made this Taiwanese Style Minced Pork to go with rice. The sauce from this dish is just great to go with rice. Kids will surely love this dish as its easy for them to chew on unlike dishes with big pieces of meat.

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She also brought some Soy Egg and Thai Style Pickled Cucumber which she prepared from home to go complement the Taiwanese Style Minced Pork.

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The Soy Egg is cooked in soy sauce, sugar, water and sometimes with the addition of herbs and spices. This can be eaten as a snack.

Here is the recipe for the Taiwanese Style Minced Pork.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lbs minced pork
  • 6 pieces dried shiitake mushroom, soak well and finely chopped
  • 4 pieces of shallots, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon of finely chopped ginger
  • 10g rock sugar
  • 2 oz soy sauce paste
  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon five spice powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • 2 pieces bay leaves
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 small piece dried orange peel
  • 1 medium pieces of dried Buddha’s fruit (Loh Han Guo), about 1/2 of a fruit. *
  • 1 cup water

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* Buddha’s fruit is a natural sweetener. The fruit is cooling in nature and can be used as a remedy for sun stroke. It is also used as a remedy for cough and removal of phlegm.

I love Buddha’s fruit dessert soup which has sea coconut and dried longan in it.

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Chinese New Year Series: Asam Gai Choy

I made this Asam Gai Choy as a side dish for the Chinese New Year Hotpot gathering. My late mom always made Asam Gai Choy or Kiam Chai Boey after a festive celebration. This dish is made with leftovers from a large meal.

Asam Gai Choy is a sour and spicy dish. You can adjust the sourness and spiciness according to your preference. I love it very sour and spicy. This dish is great with steam rice and very appetizing.

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There are only a few key ingredients for this stew.

  • Leftovers meat. Instead of leftovers meat, I used roasted pig feet. You can get this from Chinese BBQ store at a relatively cheap price, usually $1 to $1.50 per feet.

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  • Gai Choy or mustard greens. Gai Choy is a pungent green and is usually cooked for a long period with pork on bone to absorb the flavor form the meat. Mustard greens are extremely high in Vitamin A and K.
  • Gai Choy comes in 2 types, big leaves and small leaves, They taste the same. I would prefer the small leaves if I can get them, save time on tearing up the big leaves.

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  • Pickled mustard. This will gives the dish the required saltiness without any addition of salt.

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  • Asam pei or tamarind skin. It gives the dish the sourish flavour. You may substitute with tamarind paste if the skin is not available.

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  • Dried chilies. The chillies give the dish the spiciness.

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Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Szechuan Pork Chop

Yvonne’s second dish is Szechuan Pork Chop or more likely as Spice Salt Pork Chop. Yvonne got a great deal from a grocery store which offers buy one get one free pork chop. She made a big platter of Pork Chops.

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The Pork Chops were served over Fusilli pasta and fried skewered sweet peppers and steamed brocolli. The drippings from the baking of the Pork Chops made a great sauce for the pasta.

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Yvonne also made a sweet potato and yam soup as dessert. I love dessert soup.

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Ingredients

  • 2 pounds of pork chop
  • 2 teaspoons sesame seed oil
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons spice salt
  • 2 teaspoons corn starch
  • 2 teaspoons ‘Sar Geong Fern’
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup Mirin
  • 2 tablespoons pineapple juice
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 inch of ginger, minced
  • salt, pepper and sugar to taste
  • juice from half a lemon

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Click on the link below for the instructions.

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Stir-fried Pork with Bamboo Shoots and Dried Oysters

Winnie’s second dish is a very versatile dish which is a very Chinese homey dish. Winnie’s Stir-fried Pork with Bamboo Shoots can be substituted with many other ingredients like sweet peppers, wood-ears, green onions, ‘Shiitake mushrooms, etc. This is another dish which goes well with steam rice.

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup or more boiled bamboo shoots
  • 1/2 lb pork, cut into thin slices
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 tablespoons soysauce
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 shallots, thinly slice
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 6 pieces of dried oyster, soaked and boiled to soften
  • 1/4 cup water

Click on the link below for the instructions.

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