Blue Fjord Salmon from DinnerWorks.com

This is about the other meal we got from DinnerWorks.com. It is called the Blue Fjord Salmon. Although it is frozen salmon, it is surprisingly very good. The meat was flaky and moist while the skin was really crisp.

_MG_5611_edited-1

In this meal assembly, we get six individually packed Wild Sockeye Salmon fillets. Since six is a bit too much for us, we had earlier split the order into three and three. The meal assembly includes the salmon and the Blue Fjord marinade.

The salmon are frozen. However, we were told that fish frozen at sea and thawed in the refrigerator is as good than fresh market fish for flavor and texture. This info is new to us. What do you think — is that right?

_MG_5597_edited-1

Instead of typing the cooking instructions, here it is on the label. Click on this picture to blow it up if the print is too small to read.

_MG_5607_edited-1

I marinate the salmon as they thaw out from the packaging. I place them in a shallow dish with the skin side down. Doing this will crisp the skin really nicely. Marinating the salmon requires 6-10 hours. I normally don’t marinate it that long.

Oh yeah, have I told you what the secret ingredient of this dish is? It’s the whiskey.

The marinate in made up of:

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 2 oz whiskey
  • 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons chopped green onions

_MG_5600_edited-1

After marinating, place the salmon steaks on a baking sheet, lined with aluminum foil. I pour the marinate and scallions into a sauce pan and bring it to a boil. If I don’t remove the scallions too, they will burn in the oven.

_MG_5603_edited-1

You may either grill or broil the salmon. I broiled it for 10 minutes. It’s done when the flesh flakes easily when tested with a fork.

_MG_5613_edited-1

I have salmon close to this before but did learn a couple of ingredients that really enhances the taste. It looks really yummy out from the oven, smells lovely and the taste? Perfecto!

This Post Has 0 Comments

  1. Christa

    Frozen in the docks or not, it’s never the same as “fresh” fresh fish…but it’s a lot better than fish that’s just kept cold for 2-3 days before they sell it as “fresh”. Over here in the UK where I am it seems to be impossible to get fresh fish. Even in the fish market where the fish should be really fresh, it’s outright stinky.
    And shrimps is something that I stay away from over here for this reason.

    It’s really very simply to transport fish frozen if you have to, so it amazes me that they simply can’t get it right. After all, this island ain’t THAT big ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Salmon is nice, but it has to be fresh. The kind you’ll find in the fish market here is more red than light pink as it should be. So I usually buy it over the counter in a grocery store…at least they have it in ice.

    Enuf ranting about fresh fish ๐Ÿ˜‰

  2. Suanne

    Hi Christa: One thing good about Vancouver is that we don’t have smelly markets. I think it’s because of very strict food hygiene imposed. Salmon is common here in BC. Have you ever seen a salmon run before? They are really something. Hey, thanks for the longish comments — I enjoyed reading it.

  3. Christa

    Yup…my best friend back in Sweden had a river just behind the house that was full of salmon…so I saw it a lot of times ๐Ÿ™‚

    And just like you, I’m not use to smelly fish markets. But it’s very common over here and in some grocery stores in the US too.

Leave a Reply