Kuala Lumpur Day 7: Bak Kut Teh Breakfast

Ben and I started day 7 with breakfast with my father. After 12 years leaving Malaysia, we tried to meet up with families as much as we can.

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My father brought us to another Bak Kut Teh restaurant. In Malaysia, pork rib soup is served whole day; breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper. This particular restaurant only served breakfast because they will sell out by lunch time. Apparently, it is run by an ex-neighbor.

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Chinese tea is always served with Bak Kut Teh. Tea has cleansing effect on greasy food and cleaning tea cups, :-).

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Fresh cut chili and raw minced garlic are a must condiments for Bak Kut Teh, accompany with light and dark thick soy sauce.

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My father ordered an individual pot of “big bone” as I recalled correctly. Look at the skin of the pork. The bak kut teh here is different from our first bkt meal. The broth was thicker (more gelatinous) and darker. I think this version is the one that made in a big pot where the meat has been simmering for a longer time.

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Ben and I shared a mix pot.

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We had a leaner cut of meat. Our pot also has pork intestines and pork ribs. We wanted to order pork stomach at first but was already sold out.

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Ben’s favourite way to eat rice, either┬ádoused with soup or sauce.

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On the side, we ordered a serving of chicken feet. They were too tender, breaking up the moment we picked them up.

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We also had a pot of tofu puff. The tofu puff used in bak kut teh is usually rectangle shape. I cant this type in Richmond.

The meal was RM55 (CAD19).

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After breakfast, we came across a fruit stall selling ciku. I bought some to snack as I have not have this for more than 12 years.

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The ripen ciku is extremely sweet. However the unripen ones will leave an unpleasant feel in your mouth with tannin like stuff sticks to your tongue.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Philip

    Aahh, the ciku! Haven’t had one for more than twenty years. I think there is a Mexican version of it. I once noticed it in a Mexican supermarket in Pittsburg, California. It is at least five times larger than the Malaysian one. I do not know what it is called but maybe someone can educate me on it.

  2. DoubleOO

    It’s kind of heavy for breakfast, I don’t think they are available anywhere else in hk or mainland China.

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